Stills V3

November 29, 2008

A Highland Duck

Filed under: akikana — akikana @ 06:50

Kamikochi, Nagano-ken, Japan.

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10 Comments »

  1. Ah — the bird theme lives on! The “chimping” girls are really the main interest, though, despite the sharp focus on the duck. I wish the girl’s hand on the left wasn’t cut off, but on the whole I find the image delightful. It works beautifully on many levels.

    Comment by Christina — November 29, 2008 @ 19:35

  2. Christina: The negative includes all the girl’s limbs. The EpsonScan likes to crop which is the offset of a generally quick scanning process in order to see the shots on the PC. Need to get a little more inside the Epson software in order to sort the cropping out a little more.

    Comment by akikana — November 30, 2008 @ 02:40

  3. The chimping supplies a strong link to the duck as I’m making the assumption they have just photographed the bird. Of course in chimping they have just missed the opportunity to take the better picture of some chap with a camera kneeling down with a camera apparently worshiping a duck.

    Once seen the duck stands out well, initially its camouflage hid it.

    Comment by Rex — November 30, 2008 @ 08:33

  4. The duck almost distracts from the spectacular mountain behind but one shouldn’t begrudge it its place in the watery eco-system in the foreground. I’m not so sure that the girls were photographing the duck: usually they take themselves against the sights they’ve come to see. I think that the duck is what Akikana has spotted (looks like a mallard but do they exist in Japan?). The cut off hand is quite suitable to accentuate the fact that people are relatively insignificant in such surroundings.

    Comment by John Ellis — December 2, 2008 @ 07:47

  5. I forgot to mention that the square format works really well here, linking the duck, the girls and the mountain.

    Comment by John Ellis — December 2, 2008 @ 11:54

  6. I’d want to include the hand, so if you have it you need to fix your scanning routine.

    Having the area of focus in the bottom right corner like that is a real challenge to this viewer. I keep leaving the duck and seeking out something else to be the focus/subject. It is a picture to relax into and for some reason I’m not relaxing.

    Comment by Colin — December 3, 2008 @ 18:53

  7. Yes, bring back the hand!

    ‘It is a picture to relax into and for some reason I’m not relaxing.’

    For me, my eye goes from duck, along the line of stones, to the girls, then up to the snow covered mountains, then down to the lake. No rest for the eyes.

    Comment by matt — December 4, 2008 @ 13:33

  8. The missing hand is awkward; but, for me, this a story from the duck’s point of view and the girl’s are only bit players, after all. I think that is a wry smile on the duck, as he considers all the silly tourists who have photographed one another in his territory without seeing anything at all.

    Comment by Anita Jesse — December 5, 2008 @ 19:34

  9. Thanks for the comments. The girls in the background had just got their picture taken against the backdrop of the mountains. Apart from the ducks, there wasn’t a great deal of other wildlife to easily see in the area. We had some binoculars so we could pick out some of the smaller birds flitting around the trees before moving further down the mountain for winter. Kamikochi closes during the winter for tourists though I guess some hardy climbers do try the ranges. Also had a look through my Epson scanning software and one click of a check-box has resoved all my scanning problems.

    Comment by akikana — December 10, 2008 @ 04:30

  10. I enjoy this picture, the duck does get a little lost amongst all the other material around it but then that is what camouflage is all about. The duck is wondering if you have any food for him/her.

    A well balanced and good picture.

    Comment by Robert Hoehne — December 11, 2008 @ 23:03


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