Stills V3

February 4, 2009

Monkey On A Bridge

Filed under: akikana — akikana @ 07:58

Kamikochi, Nagano-ken, Japan.

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11 Comments »

  1. Re-posted

    Comment by akikana — February 4, 2009 @ 11:11

  2. What a funny looking animal. And look! There is a monkey as well.

    Tones here distinctly vintage. I suspect it is that light smudge coming in top centre that is doing it.

    Comment by Colin — February 4, 2009 @ 16:00

  3. I love the slightly surreal feel of the monkey just ‘being there’ compared to my Western notions of them being in a zoo. It’s eye/sight line leads well to the photographer not paying any attention in the rear of the scene, too.

    Comment by Gordon — February 4, 2009 @ 17:18

  4. I imagine that these monkeys exist a little bit in the way that the apes on Gibraltar do – but these probably have a lot more room.

    Did you repost because of your rendering of the road? That seemed to be the key difference from what I remember.

    I like the look and feel of this: its composition and the tones. The photographer lifts it considerably.

    Comment by John Ellis — February 5, 2009 @ 11:17

  5. I really like watching the expressions of monkeys and apes. I’d love to know what he’s looking at.

    I can’t quite decide if the photographer in the background is a distraction or a useful foil.

    Comment by doonster — February 5, 2009 @ 13:39

  6. I don’t think the photographer contributes initially as he almost merges into the barrier. He comes later as I explore the image.

    I know I’m guilty of anthropomorphism but that monkey looks p’d off and bored.

    How do you photograph animal fur so it looks focused?

    Comment by Rex — February 7, 2009 @ 21:11

  7. My first thoughts are where is the cage, typical westerner I guess.
    I am interested in the gentleman in the background and the forlorn look on the monkey’s face.

    Comment by Robert Hoehne — February 8, 2009 @ 11:44

  8. I like the photographer and the fact that there is a bit of a delay before I see him. His posture adds to the story for me. While he appears a bit off-balance and awkward all hunched over that way, the monkey is relaxed and quite self-possessed. The framing is wonderfully effective.

    Comment by Anita Jesse — February 8, 2009 @ 16:08

  9. The composition here seems just perfect — you are a master of this square format. Although the image would probably still be interesting without the photographer, I think between the monkey’s backward look and the photographer’s forward look, he really adds something important to the scene.

    Comment by Christina — February 9, 2009 @ 05:39

  10. Thanks for the comments. The ‘chimps’ were not being that co-operative for the picture I really had in mind. The monkey was a little distracted by some inter-group squabbling. He was a big guy and spooked me out when he came striding up behind me (at the far end of the bridge). Not blessed with a long lens and also aware of his mood I was very lucky to get this shot off. A few seconds after catching this one he was off again and soon involved in some fisticuffs with his group. The following morning I watched as they had breakfast which was interesting to be a part of. Depending on which part of Japan you are in these monkeys are either a pleasure or a pain. In kamikochi they still seem wary of humans so don’t approach them begging for food…which they do in Nikko to great distress to all involved. A group of these monkeys up in Aomori have recently needed to be trimmed becasue their breeding has been so successful. The ‘excess’ are now being taken in by zoos up and down the country.

    Comment by akikana — February 10, 2009 @ 04:26

  11. Because this is b/w I am not sure whether this is a snow monkey or not. Last night we watched a BBC Natural World programme about snow monkeys in Japan, including in the Kamikochi park. You should be able to download it from the BBC site.

    Comment by John Ellis — February 14, 2009 @ 08:04


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