Stills V3

June 1, 2009

passing lane

Filed under: Gordon McGregor — Rex @ 14:36

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12 Comments »

  1. That’s serious stuff: special lanes for runners! Is the dog about to lift its leg or has it just finished? There is a strong sense of two different lifestyles being played out in contrast with one another here.

    I like the curves on the left and wonder whether the the whole frame should have been shifted very slightly left.

    Comment by John Ellis — June 2, 2009 @ 06:47

  2. maybe up and left. I strongly suspect I framed it for the grass arc coming out of the corner. More of an instinctive response to what was unfolding than any planning, at 200mm with people running.

    I think moving the frame up and left might be better – maybe I like them bang in the middle – not sure. I do feel it is one of the better shots at capturing the normality of the crazy thing they are training for.

    Comment by Gordon — June 2, 2009 @ 15:20

  3. of course looking again, I also realise that a higher framing would have brought the dull and overly bright sky into the frame, probably something else I was avoiding. A 3 foot taller photographer might have helped, with hindsight.

    Comment by Gordon — June 2, 2009 @ 15:20

  4. I had no instinctive, nor have any rational, desire to move up.

    Comment by John Ellis — June 2, 2009 @ 18:51

  5. The runner does look very pedestrian in this shot, almost knackered.

    It it happenstance or is there a fair bit of vignetting?

    I’d have put the grass/path in the corner.

    Comment by Rex — June 2, 2009 @ 21:25

  6. yup,it would be about 6 hours into the workout at this point. She was starting to struggle a bit.

    Comment by Gordon — June 3, 2009 @ 05:46

  7. I’m wondering how this would change if the runner was in line with the walkers (i.e. a stride further back). In calling this “passing lane” you’ve brought attention to the fact that the runner has overtaken the walkers, but visually it might have been more intriguing if the first impression was of a set of three people that only slowly resolved itself into the real story.

    Comment by Colin — June 3, 2009 @ 10:13

  8. The runner’s work and dedication to her sport is well illustrated by the contrast between her and the leisurely walkers with dog, child, and cell phone to ear. Images showing mainly the back of people (or in some cases, the crack of people) don’t always work for me, but this one does.

    Comment by Christina — June 4, 2009 @ 20:09

  9. I second Christina’s commments. Those backsides tell some interesting stories. I get a kick out the fact that everyone, even the dog, has one leg either lifted or in the process of being lifted.

    Comment by Anita Jesse — June 8, 2009 @ 18:59

  10. Like Christina, back view shots tend not to work in my eyes. But for this one I can ignore that because I am solely focusing on the dog. Do the next few frames on the roll (or card) have the leg fully cocked? Even if it happened and you caught it, this would have been the stronger shot. The thought of the action rather than the actual action tends to be a much stronger image for me.

    Comment by akikana — June 9, 2009 @ 06:27

  11. just a tad to much empty in the lower frame, but I’d rather the lower area than a bright sky.
    A great story teller.

    Comment by Robert Hoehne — June 12, 2009 @ 05:28

  12. I like the timing and colours and the contrast in subjects. The blur & slight fall-off to the edges seems to hem it in a bit.

    I’m getting the feeling that I need to see this series all in one place. As singular images I’m getting a sense that style is over-coming subject a bit but that maybe that works in the context of a wider group.

    Comment by doonster — June 13, 2009 @ 13:20


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