Stills V3

September 6, 2009

Green tunnel

Filed under: Doonster — doonster @ 09:49

Green tunnel, Swaledale, June 2009

Computer still broken but at least I now have access to my photos (via my netbook). Will get caught up on comments later in the week.

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14 Comments »

  1. The snow (is it?) gives this an IR feel (is it?) and it is a feast of texture.
    :-)

    Comment by Rex — September 6, 2009 @ 11:25

  2. Snow? Title & date not giving it away?

    Comment by doonster — September 6, 2009 @ 14:22

  3. LoL so it is snow!

    Comment by Rex — September 6, 2009 @ 15:34

  4. The juxtaposition of tunnel and hill across the wall is a major part of the composition. The lively tracery of the main tree, which I think is ash, is a strong link all those components. Some people like IR and its look but I am not such a fan and so I would do the conversion differently: but each method has its proponents and a matching audience. The near end of the wall does look good and the hill above feels right.

    Comment by John Ellis — September 9, 2009 @ 07:03

  5. I would do the conversion differently. No conversion, no IR. That’s FP4+ film.

    Comment by doonster — September 9, 2009 @ 11:53

  6. Doonster – thanks for the film info. I’ve never used FP4+ (FP4 last in 1997 though a chemist)and therefore wouldn’t know what to expect of it. Do you work it for an effect? I know that whatever the author wants is his/her call and I would never complain that a particular conversion/development is wrong, just how I see it and react to it; and I think that we all have our favourite b/w ‘look’. My feeling with this is that the seasonal white flowers are slightly overwhelmed by the rendering of the leaves, so to a certain extent it is a relative comparison as well.

    Comment by John Ellis — September 9, 2009 @ 12:56

  7. I feel like the upper right corner lets the wind out of this. Close that hole, and the tunnel effect is complete. With the hole open, I’m drifting.

    Comment by matt — September 9, 2009 @ 18:10

  8. Interesting comments so far on this. Nice textural effect and and I like it, but see where the idea of snow and IR came in here. It is difficult — at least at this size and resolution — to tell leaves, flowers, (or snow). Unlike Matt, I’m okay with the open corner and enjoy having two places to choose to travel.

    Comment by Christina — September 10, 2009 @ 00:14

  9. Matt – isn’t the landscape there for drifting?!

    Comment by John Ellis — September 10, 2009 @ 06:45

  10. Now the top right is mentioned it becomes all important. Not sure what side of the (stone) wall I’m on yet but I’d slightly favour its inclusion for the reasons that Christina alludes. The lean of the wall and the direction of the branches all point my eye in that direction even with the forced tunnel. However, and it’s probably a presentation problem, the detail in that top right is a little lacking.

    Comment by akikana — September 12, 2009 @ 05:21

  11. It is an entirely different photo with and without that top right corner. Without it the image is much more intense. With it, I’m relaxed and enjoying the beauty.

    Comment by Colin — September 15, 2009 @ 07:48

  12. oh for a figure at the end of that leading lane. Something indistinct and perhaps ominous. For my eye, that would add so many more narrative layers to the image

    Comment by Gordon — September 15, 2009 @ 15:51

  13. John – on the film: I find FP4+ fairly smooth toned and low contrast. Produces gorgeous medium format. I tend to process the contrast up on 35mm shots.
    Lightness & (lack of) detail top right mainly due to the bright, hazy conditions, IIRC. And I rate the film down at 200 for more shadow detail.

    Comment by doonster — September 16, 2009 @ 21:07

  14. I am always drawn to photos that layer texture on texture and this certainly does a bang up job. It’s rather nice having all that light at the top. It allows me a way out of that tunnel, but doesn’t spoil its impact .

    Comment by Anita Jesse — September 25, 2009 @ 19:29


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