Stills V3

June 14, 2011

Red – today

Filed under: Mike — sojournerphoto @ 22:15

 

Advertisements

9 Comments »

  1. A walk round farms a month ago, before the weather broke, revealed stunted crops with yellow leaves, very different from this.

    I was once told that the inclusion of a poppy in an image made it more saleable, so this image must be worth a fortune. I assume this is a wild meadow due to the large variety of plants, good for insects and birds. It is emotive, I can almost smell this image.

    I like the title-today. My equivalent was (Just Now) where the capture, processing and publishing were all completed within the day. Going out with the intent of doing that, I found quite a challenge and it didn’t always work!

    Comment by Rex — June 19, 2011 @ 19:52

  2. There are a lot of photos of poppies so it is difficult to make something original. Not a problem here. The lowish pov and use of the near distance concentrates one’s attention on the flowers themselves and also allows a more direct connection of red with blue. The reds are wonderfully concentrated here but I think that the daisies help a great deal in the way they interact with the overall projection of the colour. What are the spiky grasses? They also help with the overall texture of the shot.

    If Rex is comparing this to cash then best to invest in the poppy standard!

    Comment by zavaell — June 20, 2011 @ 06:40

  3. On the technical front the exposure of the reds looks well managed. I have found that the red pixels seem to saturate very easily when photographing red flowers. So a lot of care is required to avoid loss of detail, something I often forget to do with the first take! Iterative exposure!

    Comment by Rex — June 20, 2011 @ 17:49

  4. To perhaps answer questions that Rex and John have posed regarding the nature of the field, I’d suggest that this scene is typical of the riot of diversity that emerges once a field of rape has gone to seed.

    In otherwords John, I don’t think that tall spikey stuff, that you refer to, is grass. No, I think it’s rape (minus the flower heads). If you look carefully there’s still one or two shorter, late developers, with flower heads intact on the lhs’

    Comment by cgcooke — June 20, 2011 @ 21:33

  5. Thanks for that Chris. You can tell that I don’t live in an arable area of the UK! No oil-seed rape, no poppies – apart from the latter in our garden.

    Comment by zavaell — June 21, 2011 @ 06:37

  6. Thanks all. Yes, the edge of a field of rape after it’s gone to seed. I’ve always found poppies and flowers in general very hard to photograph and was pleased with this. This was very much a saw, felt, shot picture, albeit with a delay whilst I attended a meeting between the initial seeing and the exposure. In print it looks great – plenty of light to allow a fast shutter speed too.

    At the moment I’ve been doing a lot of dricing between Harrogate, Leeds and Necastle and the poppies are having a bumper year. If I wasn’t run ragged at the moment I’d be tempted to o out and spend a couple of hours just making pictures of them.

    Rex, the exposure was iterative. This was the second of 5 frames and the first was a test to determine a base exposure – the upside of digital capture. I’ve always found yellows the worst in digital. Sunlit daffodils are almost impossible to keep from blowing out without heavy underexposure and lots of fill light in raw processing. Film of course, handles them fine:)

    Comment by sojournerphoto — July 1, 2011 @ 22:40

  7. Rex said: “On the technical front the exposure of the reds looks well managed. I have found that the red pixels seem to saturate very easily when photographing red flowers. So a lot of care is required to avoid loss of detail, something I often forget to do with the first take! Iterative exposure!”

    I’m going to guess that the reds here may actually represent reality — however, to my eye the poppies look somewhat harsh and over saturated. It is probably just me, since my job requires that I deal constantly with what colors are possible to be printed on an offset press, and I instantly recognized that color as one that will not reproduce faithfully. It is rather sad, really, to think that my profession may have dampened my enthusiasm for certain very bright, saturated colors!

    I prefer the demure, (and easily printed) little daisy-like flowers. Hate to think what this says about me!

    Comment by Christina — July 9, 2011 @ 21:35

  8. Christina, welcome back. Yes, the reds represent reality here, as far as I am able and subject to your browsers colour management and screen gamut:) The whole is as I recall it.

    My epson 3880 makes a nice job of printing this, though I too look for out of gamut colours when printing.

    Mike

    Comment by sojournerphoto — July 9, 2011 @ 22:21

  9. a beuatiful splash of colour and much appreciated after a week of rain and miserable weather in Sydney. The field looks like it is covered in meandering butterflies, ther is a very relaxed and fresh feeling to this.

    Waiting for Spring…

    Comment by rhoehne — July 25, 2011 @ 11:57


RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.