Stills V3

January 17, 2012

Homage

Filed under: Mike — sojournerphoto @ 23:41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I photographed this one evening whilst filling up with diesel on the way home. A homage if you will, and recently used in a postcard project as well.

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9 Comments »

  1. I’m not sure what you have done with your caption/comment as it has become detached from the picture.

    Nor am I sure to what you are paying homage – I trust not Shell! Maybe it is because it is where you normally stop and going home is something to be worshipped!

    It is a very attractive-looking shot: I wouldn’t have managed it in the past month as the scene would have been screened by rain or drizzle! The balance is just right and the background industrial unit (?) is good context and yet remains tantalizingly unknown.

    The twentieth and twenty-first centuries’ shrine – but for how much longer?

    Comment by zavaell — January 19, 2012 @ 08:00

  2. I think that the fuel and the stations are something that we take for granted and they are ubiquitous in our society. It is when things go wrong and fuel is in short supply that suddenly they do become places of worship. So the image captures an important bit of our society.

    I read an article recently about a new battery from IBM and they had a breakthrough which meant that the cell had an energy density similar to that of petrol. That would be a real challenge for petrol/diesel. The difficulties they overcame included a propensity for the cells to catch fire if any moisture got into the cell!

    Comment by Rex — January 22, 2012 @ 21:26

  3. great balance of colours. I had not noticed the industrial building at the back until mentioned, these are possibly mobile phone antennae but look like some spire from a place of worship. Fitting.
    I visit these only once a month these days due to my bike riding, don’t miss these places at all. Still scratch my head at people that line up for fuel leaving their engines running and then complaining about the prices, they do not how to turn their engines off?

    Comment by rhoehne — January 22, 2012 @ 22:45

  4. Mike I am not sure I am getting this. Homage to what? Perhaps it would become clearer if we knew the link to the postcard project you have mentioned.

    Comment by Cem — January 22, 2012 @ 22:46

  5. Hi all

    Thanks for your comments. The homage comment was a reference to several historic photos of american ‘gas’ stations, inlcuding Robert Frank and (I think) Walker Evans.

    The picture presented itself and, whilst aware of the little bit of history, I made the exposure for the scene before me.

    Mike

    Comment by sojournerphoto — January 23, 2012 @ 00:18

    • Ah, I now begin to understand it Mike. It is interesting to note that this picture being so current and modern, one does not immediately consider the possibility that it may in 50 years’ time become a classical historical ‘gas station’ picture. Good capture!

      Comment by Cem — January 23, 2012 @ 09:26

      • It would be nice to think it was a classical historical picture, but I suspect that in 50 or so years’ time, it will be a corrupted file on an old and rusty hard drive:) No negs formed in this capture.

        Still, there are 10 or so copies all around the world now as we ran a postcard (everyone to each other) project on Rangefinder Forum. It was a good an denjoyable project.

        Oh, and you shall taste some sourdough one day.

        MIke

        Comment by sojournerphoto — January 23, 2012 @ 22:09

  6. Now I am asking myself why this image should appeal to me more than Rex’s below it. Perhaps in part it’s because I’m attracted by the colors. The blues and yellows are, as John mentioned, very well balanced. And the light above and that tiny moon in the sky relate.

    It does have a timeless feel to it for some reason, so I could go with the idea of a “classical historical” gas station picture.

    Comment by Christina — January 24, 2012 @ 05:25

  7. Coming back to this picture, there is an interesting tension. Christina highlighted that the image is attractive – I find it so – yet the main subject matter is a petrol station, run by an oil company that we, as a society, largely deride these days (whilst still enjoying the fruits of their labours). The combination of attractive, yet polluting and the place of the theme in the history of photography make this interesting to me at least:)

    Comment by sojournerphoto — February 7, 2012 @ 01:13


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