Stills V3

April 14, 2012

Above and below the dark arches

Filed under: Mike — sojournerphoto @ 08:39

 

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7 Comments »

  1. I have been taking pictures, on and off, around Leeds for a few years now and often find it hard to get excited about. However, I liked this pairing, which could almost be thoght of as a part of an ongoing project in the city.

    I’m in the process of working through the back catalogue and pulling together a few books of themed pictures, both for them selves and as a springboard for moving forwards. We’re also going to move house temprarily soon, so I’m thinking about how to make that work…

    This pair is above and below the railway bridge into Leeds station – the dark arches. If you click through twice you should be able to see it at 100% of upload size on a reasonably high res screen – the file is just under 1100 pixels high.

    It would be great to have a few more posters – I don’t want to monopolise:)

    Mike

    Comment by sojournerphoto — April 14, 2012 @ 08:43

  2. The diptych is a good idea. I can’t understand why you shouldn’t be excited about what you do in Leeds: how many other people would be doing it, and would anyone be covering exactly what you are even if they did? It should be an invaluable record.

    What is interesting about this pairing is how it shows what seems to be much more change above ground, whereas under the arches one still gets a feel for the Victorian origins. Not all the change above ground is so wonderful either!! That seems to be reflected in the photos: the top one uses angles and masses well in the picture but the bottom one has more sympathetic material to work with, including colour. Did you choose not to have a train in the top one I wonder?

    Comment by zavaell — April 16, 2012 @ 06:46

    • The top one is the latest of a quite a few I’ve made from around the same (car park) vantage point – with and without trains. For this one I prefered not to have a train there as it seemed to mes with the lines of the overhead wire and support. The lower frame was a grab, almost without stopping walking and the exposure set from before I descended under the arch. Fortunately that saved the sky, and left me bringing up the shadows when I processed the file.

      This was also the first time out in that area with the 25mm lens. The external viewfinder changes the way of working – you either shoot slower because you have to focus and compose separately, or you zone focus and can shoot very fast. I had some fun doing the latter with a 21 lens on a voigtlander R4 at a party a few weeks ago. The change of focal length compared to my usual 35/50 mixes things up a bit and I’ve found myself enjoying the change, even thogh it still feels harder to make things work.

      Comment by sojournerphoto — April 21, 2012 @ 21:55

  3. I like the images but especially like the concept of making the diptych reproduce the physical relationship of the two scenes. I also make a similar observation as John has done in that the two scenes and the mood are very different, which given they are actually the same thing with differing a PoV I find that enjoyable. I think you have a good idea with this style of diptych and I wonder if you can find more?

    Comment by Rex — April 17, 2012 @ 19:04

    • Thanks Rex. Yes, I will look for some more, both in Leeds and elsewhere. I’m thinking of making a little concertina book to contain them.

      Comment by sojournerphoto — April 21, 2012 @ 21:56

  4. While considering the images as a pair I find myself looking for clues as to the relative orientation.

    Individually I find the lower image more interesting. I think it’s the strong pull (on my attention) to the doorway, in spite of all the strong direction to the right.

    Comment by cgcooke — April 24, 2012 @ 11:27

  5. I don’t find that either works alone, but together this is very strong. The opposing directions also work well for me.

    Comment by doonster — April 25, 2012 @ 12:56


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