Stills V3

September 11, 2013

that was June

Filed under: John Ellis — zavaell @ 20:56
surviving in the greenhouse

surviving in the greenhouse

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6 Comments »

  1. I’ve looked at this several times over the last couple of days, and viewing on my phone with a much more saturated screen than the crumby laptop I’m currently sitting at changes the perspective materially. I’ve really grown to like the picture – the poppies contrast perfectly with the yellows in the background – reminds me a bit of the edges of the fields around here in the summer – http://photosojourner.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/ride-6-july-2013-8-of-13.jpg – but slightly more haunting and less a direct celebration of the force of life. The poppy petals are very nicely rendered too.

    An aside – I tend to shoot either 3:2, 1:1 or 5:4 depending on film(!) format. I don’t really get on with 4:3 ratio. I have a Pana GX-1 set permanently to 3:2, but you’ve used the frame here really well and completely. I really like it.

    Comment by sojournerphoto — September 14, 2013 @ 21:40

  2. :-) Who can resist a flash of red poppies? ( One of Nora’s )
    I believe there is a move to get the centenary of 1914 remembered with the planting of a million poppies.
    I think the fact this is in a greenhouse makes it very different from the ‘normal’ field poppy type image in the lighting and surroundings.

    All my previous work was 4:3 as I tried hard to use all my pixels, but this coming season our digital images are 16:10 format with our new projector. That is proving to be a challenge!
    I am tending to take two images and stitch them to achieve the 16:10.

    Comment by Rex — September 15, 2013 @ 20:33

    • Aspect ratio is something that I think is often overlooked. One of the reasons that I still enjoy my film cameras is that I have a choice of aspect ratios and can make pictures with only one exposure – currently I’m not really wanting to stitch, though I’ve don;e it extensively in the past. One particular delight is to be able to make single frame panoramas on 35mm film with my Mamiya 7 – there is a little project in my mind for the spring summer next year, although it may get kicked off in the next few weeks time and weather permitting. I’ll need to dust the tripod off again.

      Nora’s picture is very different, but also lovely and the merit is well deserved.

      Comment by sojournerphoto — September 15, 2013 @ 20:51

  3. Thanks Mike and Rex. 4:3 has never been a problem and I switched from film without ever seriously thinking about it – I compose to what’s in the v/f! A German in our flickr group complained about it at the end of last year but that is his problem! I don’t even think about what format other photos are shot in, apart from square – which does require some skill in composing well for it.

    I didn’t have commemoration in mind when shooting this back in June, nor when selecting it last week to post here. I am neutral about its use as a remembrance tool for the Great War and am quite glad that the Heritage Fund turned down an application for funding for a poppy planting spree as, nice though it is, the spread of the flower into agricultural land is not particularly helpful!

    Both your links are great examples of how to capture the flower, although yours, Mike, seems to have a slight pinkish cast!

    Comment by zavaell — September 16, 2013 @ 06:36

    • My new, colour managed wide gamut laptop will arrive in a couple of weeks and banish unintentional colour casts for ever!

      Comment by sojournerphoto — September 16, 2013 @ 10:13

      • Lucky you!

        Comment by zavaell — September 17, 2013 @ 11:04


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